Meshed Up Pictures

***WARNING! THERE IS GRAPHIC MEDICAL CONTENT ON THIS PAGE INCLUDING PICTURES. MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR SOME AUDIENCES. IT IS INTENDED FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES.***

 

The manufactures of mesh products used to repair pelvic organ prolapse, stress urinary incontinence and hernia have continued to tout the mesh implant surgery as minimally invasive. What they do not tell you is that THEY HAVE NO STRATEGY FOR REMOVING MESH OR DEALING WITH THE SYMPTOMS OF COMPLICATIONS.

When life-threatening, permanent injury presents as a result of this "minimally-invasive" surgery, the EXPLANT and TREATMENT of such symptoms are anything but minimally invasive. Since a picture is worth 1,000 words, I've received permission from women and men who will remain anonymous but have agree to share their pictures in hopes it will help you understand what NOT-SO-MINIMALLY INVASIVE looks like, when the mesh must come out because of chronic intractable pain and other permanent, profound symptoms.

These are real pictures from women and men whom I've met personally. They have agreed to share their MESHED UP photos with me anonymously. I want to take this time to remind you the EACH AND EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THESE PEOPLE were told by their respective doctors and surgeons that, "Nothing is wrong with you. You are fine. You just need time to heal and/or NO! It's not the mesh, couldn't be the mesh!"

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  •  57-yr-old woman 2 weeks after umbilical hernia repair with mesh that became infected and developed absences; possibly underlying systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Vasculitis likely triggered by massive abscess at the site of hernia repair. Lesions self-limiting and abscesses drained and antibiotic coverage.

 

  •  Infected abdominal mesh - after hernia repair with polypropylene mesh

 

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  • Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) - Uterine Prolapse - Stage 4

 

 

  • If you are mesh-injured or have a mesh-injured family member, let us know if you've seen this auto-immune response. This is a skin response to underlying systemic illness, called acute febrile neutrophilic dermatoses or Sweet's Syndrome.

 

The Pain Doesn't Go Away 

  • Before and after mesh removal pictures.

 

Removal of AMS SPARC SLING for SUI after 9 YEARS of symptoms!

  • Wound healing five days after transvaginal mesh removal.

 

MESH EXPLANT SURGERY

  • Wound healing three days after polypropylene mesh removal.

 

 

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